Frequently Asked Questions

Why has UEFA launched the Cleaner Air, Better Game campaign?

According to official data from the European Union, air pollution is responsible for over 400,000 premature deaths every year in Europe. The air quality in some 130 European cities does not meet the requirements of the EU. In other words, air pollution is a threat to our health and our game. Through this campaign, UEFA aims to use the power of football to raise awareness of the problem.

What does UEFA aim to achieve with this campaign?

This is a pilot project where UEFA aims to raise awareness of the threat of air pollution and inspire people around the world to take practical steps to cut their personal emissions, ensure cleaner air and protect the game we love.

How is this campaign contributing to cleaner air?

There are several ways in which this campaign can contribute to cleaner air.

  • Ensuring that the UEFA European Under-21 Championship finals will be a carbon neutral event.
  • Encouraging people to take steps that reduce their personal emissions and help improve the air quality where they live that can directly impact the air quality of their respective regions.

Leading legacy projects in Slovenia and Hungary. In both host nations, there is a commitment to plant trees to trap carbon pollution and promote cleaner air. More bike share stations will also be installed to encourage people to cycle around host cities rather than driving.

What sustainable activities does UEFA have and why has it not been more climate conscious in the past?

In 2020, the UEFA president, Aleksander Čeferin, announced UEFA’s support for the European Climate Pact, pledging to use football’s global reach to raise awareness of the climate emergency and inspire more people to take action to save the planet. A UEFA climate action working group was set up internally to develop and monitor sustainability-related actions.

Other sustainable initiatives implemented by European football’s governing body include:

  • Ensuring EURO 2020 will be a carbon neutral event. The organisation has also been offsetting all flights booked for staff, delegates, match officials and others for several years.
  • Introducing several energy-saving initiatives at its environmentally conscious headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. For example, recycling and phasing out the use of plastic bottles has led to savings of 39 tonnes of CO2 each year.
  • Subsidising UEFA staff’s public transport fares and offering discounts on electric bikes.

Dividing UEFA’s HatTrick football and social responsibility programme into two pillars: one social, the other environmental. Under the second pillar, UEFA member associations can claim up to €100,000 a year for environmental initiatives. Rolled out across Europe, this initiative has a considerable multiplier effect.

Who is supporting UEFA’s campaign?

This campaign has the support of:

Count Us In

The European Commission

The United Nations (Through the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change)

WWF - advised UEFA on sustainable event best practices and tournament bidding criteria, and among other things, presented sustainability champions to the organizers of UEFA’s Cleaner Air, Better Game campaign.

What is Count Us In and why does Count Us In matter?

In the next 10 years we must halve the world’s greenhouse gas emissions if we stand any chance of preventing the worst impacts of climate change. Pollution, extreme weather and rising sea levels are already threatening communities and economies around the world. Threatening our health and the health of our planet.

It is easy to feel daunted by this challenge, but together, we are building the largest and most ambitious citizen-led effort to act and protect the people and places we love, before it’s too late.

The Count Us In platform gives an easy and simple way for anyone to take high-impact, achievable steps to reduce their carbon pollution and persuade others to do the same.

What we all do counts. Our collective actions won’t just make a significant impact in reducing carbon pollution – but have the power of challenging leaders to act boldly to deliver global systems change.

Who can take part in Count Us In?

Everyone can take part! Count Us In is building the largest and most ambitious citizen-led effort to avert the impacts of climate change.

Individuals: Simply sign up on count-us-in.org , choose the step(s) that’s right for you and keep it up! You can track your progress and raise your ambition through your Count Us In profile, and see the collective impact of your actions through the Count Us In aggregator.

Organizations: Your organization or company can help Count Us In become the largest citizen climate action mobilization, by joining as a partner, and promoting Count Us In among your supporters, followers, members, staff and customers. We can also help create your own whitelabelled or customized platform, linked to our aggregator.

We welcome sister initiatives and organizations with climate action platforms to join our community, and link up to our aggregator – to add up to something even bigger. Please contact us at contact@count-us-in.org for more information on partnerships, our platform and partner platforms.

How are the carbon savings calculated for each action?

The Count Us In platform uses a range of data sources to calculate the carbon impact of each step. Aside from the step-specific sources and assumptions which are documented in the references section of each step page, there are a few other consistent assumptions:

  • All our calculations are made using carbon dioxide equivalent as a metric.
  • When taking a step, users commit to achieving a step within two months. For habitual actions (such as cycling to work), the potential carbon savings are given for the two month period; for one-off actions (such as installing solar panels) they are given for a year.
  • Users are asked to confirm how they did after two months, and whether they plan to continue. At this time, we update their potential carbon savings to show confirmed annual carbon savings.
  • While we plan to progressively internationalize, the data on the Count Us In platform is currently based on UK emissions factors and national averages, specifically:
  • Emission factor of 0.31598 kgCO2 per kWh of grid electricity (Defra conversion factors 2019) is used.
  • A fuel price conversion factor of 0.1839 £/kWh of electricity (BEIS 2019) was used.
  • The average household has 2.4 occupants.
  • Our partner platforms including UN ActNow and Giki Zero also use robust data sources and methodologies for estimating footprints and reductions.

The voice actions have no direct calculable carbon saving, but in the backend we have given them a negligible saving of 1 kg CO2e to allow the commitments to be saved in our database (it only accepts values greater than 0kg CO2e).

What is the Count Us In aggregator?

The Count Us In aggregator is a cornerstone of Count Us In. It adds up every step taken, showing the difference we can all make by acting together. From launch, the aggregator will report on three key data points: the (1) carbon impact of the steps taken; (2) the number of individuals taking steps; (3) and number of steps taken.

The Count Us In aggregator creates, for the first time, an ecosystem of partner climate action platforms, combining and synthesizing their data to show the collective impact of citizen climate action worldwide – adding weight to our effort to drive policy makers, businesses and other actors to take bold action on systems change.

Data on the impact of citizens’ climate action in the Aggregator begins from January 2020, with data sourced from additional partners as they’ve joined this effort.

Count Us In will continue to develop and gather more granular impact data through its Aggregator, and to make insights accessible through public data visualisation tools.

Who funds this initiative?

Count Us In is a non-for-profit initiative, funded by philanthropic donations and set up by partners through pro-bono work.

What is Count Us In’s selection criteria to partner with organizations?

If we come together – as individuals, governments and businesses – we can still protect the people and places we love, before it’s too late.

All organizations involved in Count Us In are committed to making a significant impact in reducing carbon pollution and driving systems change.

We are bringing together an unusual coalition of organizations and partners, united by how we work together. Partners of Count Us In have to meet our four essential criteria:

  1. Be credible in their climate change action.
  2. Be a leader in your sector, and mobilize your ecosystem to address climate change. Global corporate partners must have made a Net Zero commitment. If feasible, we encourage SME, sports organization, university, city, faith organization, and other partners to map out a pathway to join the Race to Zero campaign.
  3. Commit to meaningful action as part of Count Us In.
  4. This will be different for each Partner based on their organization and ecosystem, and we will work out with each Partner what that means to them, and how best to leverage their contribution to the campaign for launch and beyond in phases.
  5. Be visible as part of Count Us In.
  6. Put your organization’s name and brand on the CUI website and communications, and share your participation in CUI with your audience*.
  7. Uphold the Values and Principles of CUI.
  8. This will be different for each Partner based on their organization and ecosystem, and we will work out with each Partner what that means to them, and how best to leverage their contribution to the campaign for launch and beyond in phases.

To find out more about how to become a Count Us In partner, get in touch with us on contact@count-us-in.org.

*Use of the Count Us In logo does not imply an endorsement by Count Us In or any of its Steering Committee Members or Partners, of the user, its goods, services or activities, or the content of its website or linked sites or the accuracy of the information, opinions or statements provided therein.

How is Count Us In user data used?

Count Us In has commissioned Do Nation to develop and manage the platform. When you sign up to take a step you are sharing your data with Do Nation and Leaders’ Quest Foundation on behalf of Count Us In. As joint data controllers, they will manage your data according to their privacy policies and terms and conditions.

We'll use this information about you to, among other things, contact you to answer any questions you may have, measure the impact of your pledged steps, and to send you handy reminders, tips, and confirmation emails about your pledges.

If you decide you no longer want to receive any of this information, you can just let us know by emailing support@count-us-in.org with the subject line “Delete my account”. Unless you state otherwise, we'll leave your pledges on the site but anonymize them by removing all your personal data.

When you record your step, you may be given the option to share your data with the owner(s) of the Count Us In page where you recorded your step, so that they can contact you in relation to your step and their related climate change programmes. Only if you opt in will this be shared with them.

We’ll input aggregated data from the Count Us In platform and other partner platforms into our aggregator, developed by Count Us In partner Accenture and with support from our platform partners. This won’t include any of your personal data.

We will never share your contact details with other third parties without your explicit permission.

If you sign up to our mailing list, we'll send you occasional updates on the work we're doing or about things which we think may interest you. You can unsubscribe or manage preferences at any time through the emails we send you.

You'll find links to other websites on this site, those sites will have their own terms and conditions and/or privacy policies which you should read if you visit their sites.

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We will store your data on our secure servers but, due to the nature of the internet, cannot guarantee that information passed around on the internet is 100% secure.